PHILADELPHIA—The Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics (CCIC), which operates the Leaping Bunny Program in the U.S. and Canada, has serious concerns about the Safe Cosmetics and Personal Care Products Act of 2013 (SCPCPA), H.R. 1385, legislation intended to overhaul the way cosmetic products are regulated in the United States. Recently published research shows that up to 11.5 million animals would be required to test and retest finished products and ingredients for safety, reversing a decades-long decline in animal testing for cosmetics.

The article, “Safety Evaluations Under the Proposed US Safe Cosmetics and Personal Care Products Act of 2013: Animal Use and Cost Estimates,” published on January 24, 2014 in ALTEX, a peer-reviewed scientific journal, calculated that passage of the SCPCPA will result in a minimum of one million animals being used in new required testing and will cost companies between $1.7-$9 billion to perform these tests, a dramatic increase over current testing costs and numbers of animals used.

Co-author of the article Jean Knight states, “In reading the Act, I was surprised to see that it would increase animal testing of cosmetics, since this is counter to the worldwide trend to reduce animal testing. The Act’s language can’t be easily understood unless you have some background in toxicology, so this impact was flying under the radar. Many Leaping Bunny certified companies were actually supporting the Act, unaware of the implications for animal testing. The article hopefully brings this information onto the radar so that people can make informed decisions.”

Sue Leary, Chair of the CCIC states, “The authors of this article have done a great service in demonstrating that SCPCPA is a regressive bill. There has been a decisive move in recent years away from cruel and unnecessary animal testing but this bill reverses that. It’s hard to imagine why legislators would want to increase animal testing for things like lipstick and shampoo. Consumers certainly don’t want this and companies don’t either.”

CCIC believes the passage of this act is the wrong approach, and the United States should instead harmonize its cosmetics laws with those of the European Union, Israel, and India, which prohibit the use of animals to test cosmetics and their component ingredients while ensuring consumer safety.

The Leaping Bunny Program offers the most up-to-date list of companies that have committed to no new animal testing throughout their manufacturing process, from ingredients to finished products. The Leaping Bunny Logo is consistently ranked by third parties as the cruelty-free logo that can be trusted the most.

Since 1996, the Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics (CCIC) has been connecting compassionate consumers with cruelty-free companies. The CCIC is made up of the following organizations: American Anti-Vivisection Society; Animal Alliance of Canada; Beauty Without Cruelty, USA; Doris Day Animal League; Humane Society of Canada; The Humane Society of the United States; and the New England Anti-Vivisection Society. CCIC’s international partner is the European Coalition to End Animal Experiments.

Author

Amanda Foxon-Hill joined the cosmetics industry in 1998 when was offered a graduate job with chemical distributor Brenntag on condition that she complete a diploma in Cosmetic Science. With the challenge accepted, a background in chemistry and love of hands-on experimenting she set to work and before long became hooked (and a nightmare to take shopping as she would read ALL of the labels). The next move was to chemical manufacturer Octel (now Innospec) where she was responsible for the sales, marketing and formulation development of the cosmetic ingredients range in the UK and across parts of northern Europe. A move to Australia meant a new challenge and after settling in with the family Amanda joined another leading chemical distributor, Bronson and Jacobs as a Product Manager. Here she deepened her understanding of sunscreens, silicone’s and anti-ageing actives before leaving in 2007 to set up her own company. Amanda has always had a passion for science communication and after working in all areas of the supply chain saw how gaps in understanding affected sales, product development and market traction. Meanwhile the world outside of the cosmetics industry was growing more demanding thanks to the rise of blogging and an ever growing number of ‘Google’ experts. With the gulf between the backstage cosmetic world and the public widening, the time was right for some respectful thought leadership and so with an out stretched hand, a business was born. Amanda now divides her time between blogging, professional writing and consulting for a number of cosmetic companies where she advises and implements social media strategies to facilitate deeper and more personal supplier/ client relationships. Her Realize Beauty blog has developed a solid and loyal fan base of people looking for a sisterhood approach to skin and hair care information and her Cosmetic Kitchen workshops have been the highlight of many a kids and adults party

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